Cheers to Your Thanksgiving

November 22, 2017

Happy Thanksgiving! We all know that the main attraction at the Thanksgiving table is not the turkey–or tofurkey–but the cocktail menu. We are celebrating all we are thankful for (YOU!) with some fabulous, tempting concoctions to warm your body and soul. And we’re kicking it all off with two books, illustrated by Red Cap Cards artists, Josie Portillo and Danielle Kroll.

The Waldorf Astoria Bar Book with illustration by Red Cap Cards artist, Josie Portillo

First up is The Waldorf Astoria Bar Book, with interior illustration by our own Josie Portillo! It’s full of tasty cocktail recipes sure to make your Thanksgiving dinner as festive as can be. “Based on the actual bar book used by the Waldorf-Astoria prior to Prohibition, this collection of cocktails serves up more than 350 recipes. In addition to documenting the origin of many cocktails and mixed drinks still commonplace today, the book chronicles the background of their creation and the antics of some of the cronies Buffalo Bill Cody and Bat Masterson, among others who were regulars at the bar.” Check out these amazing illustrations, pulled from Portillo’s collection:

“Satchmo” via Josie Portillo
“Zaza” via Josie Portillo
“Chauncey” via Josie Portillo
“Steinway” via Josie Portillo
The Waldorf Astoria Bar Book with illustration by Red Cap Cards artist, Josie Portillo
The Art of Vintage Cocktails with illustration by Red Cap Cards artist, Danielle Kroll

If you’re not satisfied with just one, check out The Art of Vintage Cocktails by Stephanie Rosenbaum with illustration by our own Danielle Kroll! It “features 50 recipes for classic cocktails, accompanied by the history and lore of the drink. Each libation is paired with a humorous illustration by artist Danielle Kroll, who puts a witty, sophisticated twist on the drink’s name.”

The Art of Vintage Cocktails with illustration by Red Cap Cards artist, Danielle Kroll
The Art of Vintage Cocktails with illustration by Red Cap Cards artist, Danielle Kroll
The Art of Vintage Cocktails with illustration by Red Cap Cards artist, Danielle Kroll
The Art of Vintage Cocktails with illustration by Red Cap Cards artist, Danielle Kroll

If you’re running around to grocery stores and don’t have time to grab these great artisan cocktail books, grab the recipe for a few of our favorite cocktails below, including Hal’s favorite: the Manhattan Cocktail. Salud! Cheers! and Happy Thanksgiving!

Riffs: The Manhattan Cocktail

2 oz. bourbon
1 oz. sweet vermouth
2 dashes Angostura bitters
Tools: mixing glass, barspoon, strainer
Glass: cocktail
Garnish: cherry

Stir ingredients in a mixing glass with ice, strain into a chilled glass and garnish.

Photo and recipe by @express_and_discard

Rhum JM White, lime, black mission fig syrup, and white Vermouth with Koji vinegar, salt, and peppered lime.

Photo and recipe by @express_and_discard

Brennevin Akvavit, Dolin Blanc, Rainwater Madeira, Amaro Ramazotti, and Clement Creole Shrub with orange zest and spruce tip.

Photo and recipe by @liquorary

1 oz Iichiko Silhouette shochu
1 oz mango-infused @altostequila
1 oz lime
3/4 oz passionfruit syrup
3/4 oz cantaloupe juice

Sweet, fruity, and earthy. The first thing I thought when I tried this shochu was “I bet this shochu would like tequila.” They’re very different flavor profiles, but they both have an earthiness that complements each other.

Photo and recipe by @liquorary

2 oz @standardwormwooddistillery rye
3/4 oz lemon
3/4 oz lemon oleo saccarum
Shaken, over a big chunk of clear ice, and garnished with a candied @luxardousa cherry and a lemon peel.

Bold and crackling with wormwood, this Whiskey Sour is kind of perfect for autumn, tart and fresh and spicy.

Photo and recipe by @liquorary

2 oz @mainedistilleries dry gin
1/2 oz lime
14 dashes @angosturahouse Angostura bitters
7 dashes Peychaud’s bitters
7 dashes orange bitters

Lots of juniper and herbaceous notes, but instead of a sharply bitter edge, it has an almost creamy quality to it. Not quite sweet, but not really bitter, either.

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